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  • #16
    Dave...you may not have to fear. If it is hollow in behind the mantle and assuming the fire is real and produces heat and is not some sort of photoshop magic by you, it could mearly be convection at work. GAs fireplaces are efficient but they do heat up the wall cavity/fireplace enclosure which could draw air in (typically at the base in an unsealed joint or seam in the stone) and be blowing out saw dust and dirt through the worm holes. Typically termites would be more prevelant in exterior perimter wood that is moist, rotting or dark they like to take the easiest route. I would not think that you are in a termite prone area out in Ottawa. Ants tend to like areas that have access to sweet stuff sugar etc. Keep an eye on it but I think you should be fine. Check your attic and basement for other evidence of pests just in case.

    Please dont use the wood filler it would never look the same as the natural wood if you did it yourself unless you get a professional wood restorer in to make a plug and stain and grain it to match.
    "The arsonist had oddly shaped feet."

    Ron Burgundy

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    • #17
      Thanks Bannick. Actually its a new mantel (installed about 2 weeks ago) made from 2 thick slabs of pine, then stained. Kate was poking around in the holes and ended up pulling out a worm or larva from one that was still 'moist'. We'll investigate this further today... maybe we can gas them out or something

      Its an electric fireplace... its for ambience not for heat (rarely used). The mantel is removable.
      Dave - TFT Founder, Administrator & Tuck's Junky

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      • #18
        That is a nice looking electric fireplace. It looks like a sealed gas unit. What are the specs on that thing?

        You pulled out a critter eh? Who made the mantle? Talk to them see what they reccomend. Try windex it seems to work well for ants and shouldn't harm the wood.
        "The arsonist had oddly shaped feet."

        Ron Burgundy

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        • #19
          Originally posted by skicdave
          Yup that IS the best picture I have ever seen. The headwall looks like a sheer vertical drop and there are serveral small slides clearly visible. It was taken by Harold Orne during the 1937 Inferno (April 4th). The ski museum by the way sells it frame for $160. I was in a coffee shop of all places, in North Conway and saw it hanging up along a staircase frame, with a $79 price tag! Yah!
          The legend on the copy of the photo that I have on my wall says "Harvard Dartmouth Slalom, April 1937". And according to my copies of David Goodman's book the Inferno was run in 1933 - 14:41, 1934 - 12:31, and 1939 - 6:29:2

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          • #20
            Two? I just see one slab of pine...
            SkiMumster
            Fasterandmorefun

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            • #21
              What a great clock! Where did you find it? And the photo, with sleeping cat, is just perfect.
              Thanks, Dave,
              -BG
              -BG
              Is it snow time yet?

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              • #22
                Actually, Dave, that photo, which was indeed taken on April 4th, 1937, was not an Inferno, but the 1937 Eastern Slalom Championships/ Franklin Edson Memorial Race. I've got the March 26, 1937 issue of The Ski Bulletin in front of me as I type. Allow me to share with you all the article of this historic race, historic in that the course-setter, Dick Durrance, had seen a need for a new race that was faster and with fewer gates than your traditional slalom race, but with not as much of the 'free-for-all' approach of the downhill, or down-mountain races. It was on that day that Durrance debuted the experimental course called the Giant Slalom. Here's the are the two articles in their entirety:

                EASTERN SLALOM CHAMPIONSHIPS
                Tuckerman's Ravine, Mt. Washington, will be the scene on April 4th of the Eastern Slalom Championships. The Dartmouth Outing Club is sponsoring and conducting the race and the Amateur Ski Club of New York is offering the Franklin Edson Memorial Trophy in memory of Franklin Edson III, one of their members who died as a result of injuries sustained while racing for the Club on the Ghost Trail in Pittsfield (Mass), March 1936. This trophy, the most beautiful so far to be offered in ski competition, will be held by the winner for one year who will be presented with a replica for permanent possession. It is proposed to run the race under F.I.S. rules and the new "open race" rule of the National Ski Association which allows ski teachers to compete with amateurs under certain restrictions. Actually, one race will be run, but there will be separate scoring for an "open" class and for "amateur" class. The fastest time, whether professional or amateur, will win the Eastern Slalom Championship, and the fastest amateur time will win the Franklin Edson Memorial Trophy and the Eastern Amateur title. This arrangement should bring together one of the finest groups of contestants so far seen in the east.
                Though the term "Slalom Championship" would indicate a slalom competition as we know it, this race will be in the form of a "Giant Slalom", entirely new in this country. The course will be laid out by Dick Durrance of the Dartmouth Outing Club and will run from the top of Mt. Washington, over the headwall and down the Sherburne Trail, or as much of that distance as snow conditions and weather indicate as safe and reasonable.
                After the death of Franklin Edson III last year, the Amateur Ski Club of New York conducted a thorough survey of accidents sustained while skiing, their causes and results, and sought ways and means to make the sport safer and even more enjoyable than it is now. With this end in view, the Franklin Edson Memorial Trophy was offered to promote interest in a combination of skill and speed as exemplified by controlled running, and as opposed to uncontrolled speed alone. Early this season Dick Durrance, recent winner of both the National Open and Amateur Downhill, Slalom and combined Championships at Sun Valley observed that it was not exaggerating too much, to say that in order to win skiers must take absolutely straight ever steeper, straight and more dangerous trails. All of which, he added, "seems to lead to an unknown fantastic goal of perfection in skiing which no one can ever reach." As a theoretical solution he presented the "giant slalom", a downhill race controlled "in the most dangerous sections with portions of a slalom in the sense of harmonizing required turns to the particular stretch in question." (See "Controlled Downhill Skiing" by Richard Durrance in THE SKI BULLETIN Vol. VII, No. 3, January 1, 1937). ((I have that issue as well...HB))
                Such a course Dick Durrance will now lay out on Mt. Washington for the Eastern Slalom Championships, April 4.
                The Amateur Ski Club of New York in presenting the Edson Memorial Trophy feels that this type of race as outlined by Durrance most nearly approaches the spirit in which the trophy is given and that Mt. Washington and Tuckerman's Ravine is an ideal course.
                - Roland Palmedo

                Official Announcement

                The U.S. Eastern Ski Association Slalom Championship and Franklin Edson Memorial Race will be held at Mt. Washington, NH, on April 4, 1937, sanctioned by the Eastern Amateur Ski Association, organized by the Dartmouth Outing Club, with the co-operation of the White Mountain National Forest Administration, the Amateur Ski Club of New York and the Appalachian Mountain Club.
                Purpose of the Race: A considerable list of casualties in skiing during the season 1935-36 led to a general interest in what might be done to better direct and safeguard popular participation in the sport. A committee organized by the Amateur Ski Club of New York made an exhaustive and most useful survey of skiing accidents and their causes and published their findings. The same club offered a splendid new trophy, the Franklin Edson Memorial Trophy for slalom competition with the conviction that a keener interest in the slalom and the attendant development of the necessary skill and control would assist in lessening the penalties to the sport from wild running.
                Meanwhile Dick Durrance has been studying various types of races with a belief that a form of race could be devised which would place equal emphasis on skill, stamina and courage, without exaggerated emphasis on any one of these factors to the exclusion of the others. His thesis was admirably stated in his article in THE SKI BULLETIN, issue of Jan. 1, 1937, which is worth re-reading in connection with this race.
                Dick Durrance will set the course for this race. Frankly, the race will be experimental. It is likely that the form of race developed this year may not be satisfactory. The race committee urge the critical interest and support of all skiers in the race this year, for even if it does not turn out to be a satisfactory race, at least it has possibilities of continuing the evolution of a form of racing suited to eastern terrain and of progress toward a sound sport.
                The Course: The proposed course is from the summit of Mt. Washington, down the cone, over Tuckerman Headwall and down the Sherburne Trail to Pinkham Notch. Snow conditions now promise to be excellent, but it is a fifty-fifty chance that the course will have to be shortened considerably to meet either the weather or snow conditions on April 4th. Comment on the length of the course is requested from the men making entries. If a majority prefer a shorter course it will be altered accordingly.
                The course will be neither a true slalom nor a downhill, but will seek to combine the best features of each type. The course obviously requires stamina and condition. Durrance will attempt to utilize the natural variety and advantages of the terrain to set a course, likewise weighting both courage and skill. He emphatically will not try to control out high speed, but will attempt to control speed where a fall means a certainty of crack-up against dangerous obstacles. The race will not necessarily be a safe race, but it is earnestly hoped that better running, and hence safer running, will be by-products of a well-balanced race.
                Much of the course will have to be pre-set the day before the race, and it will not be possible to close the Sherburne Trail to traffic. But because it would not be possible for all competitors to practice the course before the race and because much practice might rut up the course badly, all competitors and other skiers are requested not to ski the actual course before the event. This does not preclude skiing the cone and headwall in the vicinity of the course, nor preclude skiing the Sherburne Trail.
                Report Times, Start Times, etc.,--- All competitors must report and receive numbers and starting order on the porch of Joe Dodge's house behind the Pinkham Notch Huts at 8:30am Sunday morning, April 4th. Competitors are asked to ski up the Sherburne Trail rather than walk. Spectators and all foot-traffic will be sent up the Tuckerman Ravine Path. Hot soup will be served to competitors only at the Observatory or at Camden Cottage on the top. It is planned to call the race at 1:00pm. The starting time may vary as weather conditions or other factors dictate.
                The above gives the general plans for the Race. We urge clubs sending entries to make sure their runners are familiar with these plans. We particularly urge the co-operation of clubs in entering only qualified runners who have been on snow this winter sufficiently to be prepared for a difficult, strenuous race. And comments after the race will be appreciated.
                Any inquiries should be addressed to: The Dartmouth Outing Club, Box 9, Hanover NH. (Telephones: Hanover 285 and 286).

                How do you like that? If you look again at the picture of the race, you'll see no gates on the headwall. This is because it was decided before the race that the race would not be from the summit over the headwall, but rather down Right Gully, because of the conditions. Below the end of the article in the Ski Bulletin is an entry form for the race with all the pertinent info and such. It measures 5"x7" and I'll be happy to make photocopies for any and all T4T'ers who'd like one. Heck, I'll even copy the whole article if you want. Just send me your addy.
                As a ski historian/archivist I've got a TON of ski history publications going back to the 1920's with a lot of articles and pictures of Tucks. I never make a visit there without bringing a few things to share with those I meet. It's a great ice-breaker and I love sharing what I've collected with those with the same passion for all things Tuckerman!
                HB
                Fools run schuss where angels fear to stem.

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                • #23
                  HB: You da mann!
                  Go for adventure, take pix, but make certain to bring'em back alive!

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                  • #24
                    Yeah, the pix of those two races are often confused. The Harvard-Dartmouth Slalom was run on April 18th, 1937, on nearly the same course.
                    BTW, if anyone's interested, the finishing order of the 4/4/37 race was:

                    Open Title Winner: Walter Prager 6:04.9 (Dartmouth racing coach)
                    Amateur Title Winner: Ted Hunter 6:35.9 (Dartmouth Junior)
                    2nd Place: Howard Chivers ? (Dartmouth Sophomore)
                    3rd Place: Warren Chivers ? (Dartmouth Junior)
                    4th Place: John Litchfield ? (Dartmouth Sophomore)

                    The photo on the label of each bottle of Tuckerman Ale is supposed to be the H-D Slalom from 4/18/37, but I'm not entirely sure if it isn't in fact from the race on 4/4. I'm doing further research to determine that, by comparing existing pictures of both races to find matches in background, pole placement and spectators in each shot. HB
                    Fools run schuss where angels fear to stem.

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                    • #25
                      The question marks in my last post referred to their unknown (to me) finishing times, not whether they finished in that order, which they did. HB
                      Fools run schuss where angels fear to stem.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Excellent reporting Hark Banks! Glad to have a ski historian in the membership too! I am quite interested in that era, especially skiing in NH during the 30's and 40's.

                        How are you at identifying some of the old ski equipment? I am trying to find out more about, as well as dates for some of my collection (mostly from he 30's-40's).

                        Seems everytime I go past Canon Mt the ski museum is closed
                        Dave - TFT Founder, Administrator & Tuck's Junky

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Bannick
                          That is a nice looking electric fireplace. It looks like a sealed gas unit. What are the specs on that thing?

                          You pulled out a critter eh? Who made the mantle? Talk to them see what they reccomend. Try windex it seems to work well for ants and shouldn't harm the wood.
                          The critter situation actually has deteriorated. Since returning from our trip to Jamaica, Kate spear a HUGE bug in one of the holes, and last night another was crawling around the Tuckerman Ravine Bedroom floor. Enough is enough, so we took off the mantel and put it in the garage for now. Fumigator wants $450 to gas the buggers out! The other option is to freeze them... anyone want to haul up our mantel for a weekend up at Tucks?

                          Here is one of the dearly departed criters...

                          Dave - TFT Founder, Administrator & Tuck's Junky

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                          • #28
                            Dave, looks like a Whitespotted Pine Sawyer.

                            They're nasty.

                            I know yours lacks the white spot, but maybe it faded?

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                            • #29
                              Eeeeewwww!!! I don't like bugs. As for your ski equipment, I'm pretty good with that stuff, what with all the ski ads that are in my ski archives. Should be able to get any of that nailed down pretty close. Whatcha gots?
                              Glad you like the history, too. I've got a TON of it, and I'm always looking for more! HB
                              Fools run schuss where angels fear to stem.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Hey, welcome back, Daverama. I take it you will be filling us in on the trip.

                                Sorry to hear about the bugs....
                                SkiMumster
                                Fasterandmorefun

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